Pride Month: Paralympians Robyn Love and Laurie Williams on life as new mums and representing LGBTQ+ disabled athletes | Basketball News


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To mark the start of Pride Month, Sky Sports News reporter Nick Ransom talks to GB basketball stars and couple Laurie Williams and Robin Love about motherhood, living with a disability and their plans for the future…

To mark the start of Pride Month, Sky Sports News reporter Nick Ransom talks to GB basketball stars and couple Laurie Williams and Robin Love about motherhood, living with a disability and their plans for the future…

GB basketball stars Robin Love and Laurie Williams, who became a mum for the first time in April, talk sky sports news About their relationship, new ambitions, and life as disabled moms at the start of Pride Month.

As Pride Month begins, Paralympians are writing a new chapter in their lives together. Daughter Alba arrived in April, and the pair are happier (and prouder) than ever.

Paralympians Robin Love and Laurie Williams share a tender moment with their daughter Alba

Paralympians Robin Love and Laurie Williams share a tender moment with their daughter Alba

they talk sky sports news On parenting so far, her new goals for the coming years consider the importance of representation for both the disabled and LGBTQ+ communities.

After dating for around 10 years, the couple met in 2014 when Robin joined the Great Britain basketball team. Establishing a connection almost immediately, the pair began dating and soon opened up to teammates, despite initial reservations.

Britain's Robin Love (left) and Laurie Williams shaking hands during the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

Britain’s Robin Love (left) and Laurie Williams shaking hands during the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

Since a magical proposal under the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Robin and Laurie have gone from strength to strength and have found the first month of parenting surprisingly easier than expected.

“Overall, it’s gone really well. You never know what to expect, but she really has been good as gold. It’s been challenging at times, trying to get into a routine.” But we’re finding it really rewarding,” Laurie says.

Robin explains: “I think we’ve been a perfect team and been in high-pressure situations, so having this little kid, I think we definitely have that experience which has helped us handle it.” Is it.”

Lowry thinks competing together on the court has proven to be a factor in their positive upbringing: “Through sports, you’re made to be a really good communicator, so from the beginning we told how we were feeling and what we found challenging.”

Britain's Paralympian Laurie Williams (L) and her partner Robin Love

Britain’s Paralympian Laurie Williams (L) and her partner Robin Love

“I think we had this comparison with this natural competition, like we wanted to get it right to make your life easier, but also for Alba’s.”

After competing together in the delayed Paralympic Games in Tokyo, the couple learned that Laurie was pregnant while Robin was playing for Scotland at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham. A long road of IVF had proved successful. Both were ecstatic.

The nature of the discovery was one reason the pair chose to name their daughter Alba, the Gaelic word for Scotland, something they said “just felt right”. Robin smiles and says, “Scottish people are very proud.”

While aware of the pitfalls of social media, Laurie says luckily everyone has been very supportive, including other disabled moms. “I think it’s important to highlight that there’s nothing you can’t do, you just need to adapt.”

Britain's Robin Love (C) during the Tokyo Summer Paralympic Games.

Britain’s Robin Love (C) during the Tokyo Summer Paralympic Games.

Laurie grew up with motor neuropathy, which affected the nerves in her torso and legs, while Robyn was born with arthrogryposis with short muscles, meaning her right leg is shorter than her left.

Robin knew the power of representation and its importance growing up: “I didn’t see LGBT people, people with disabilities, never the two things combined. Personally, I didn’t see myself represented in the media.”

She says this experience has been a driving force for both of them to be positive role models for the LGBTQ+ community, but it is also important to raise awareness of the extent of disability.

“I didn’t see myself representing [during my childhood] because i can walk, i can Play sports Although I could not run very fast or jump very high, but sports were everything to me. In fact, I came to know about Paralympic disability sport only when I was 22 years old.”

Robin watched Laurie compete at the 2012 Paralympics in London before meeting her two years later. On the increased coverage of disability sport, Laurie comments “So many people have now said ‘I’ve seen it all on television, isn’t it cool?'”

Britain's Robin Love (C) during the Tokyo Summer Paralympic Games.

Britain’s Robin Love (C) during the Tokyo Summer Paralympic Games.

“That performance, it not only educates people but also gets people into the sport. I wish I had seen it on television when I was younger and I could have started at a younger age. Started, but you want to be able.” Participate in sports like your able-bodied counterparts.”

With Alba settling into daily life, Laurie and Robin are happier than ever. They are also eager for more sporting success, with Robin turning her attention to a sport she played growing up.

Earlier this month, she announced she was retiring from international wheelchair basketball. Passion drives her, she says, admitting tennis was her “first love”. Smiling, Robin says, “I love hitting the ball… I love the sound.

“I feel like I owe it to myself to follow my dreams because with Alba, I want her to feel like she can do anything, and I think that as a parent It’s really important, that if you’re going to preach it, you’ve got to practice it.”

Robin says that switching to wheelchair tennis will test him psychologically without a teammate to support him on “that service line”. She explains: “The biggest challenge is how I talk to myself and support myself.”

Laurie is sticking to wheelchair basketball and is looking forward to competing at the 2024 Paralympic Games in Paris to do the “high end”. After the disappointment in Tokyo, following a quarter-final exit, he is keen to help Great Britain make a mark.

“We were on our way to bring home the medal [in Tokyo] And we’re not quite there yet, but I think now, for me, having a kid, it gives you a completely different perspective on life, like everything has changed for me.

“I think, going to Paris and competing, I’ll be satisfied, because I know how much I’ve already achieved. When you win, it’s not about winning a medal, like There are many different ways you can win … in life, and I think Alba is one of them.”

Laurie and Robin fuck with each other And Alba. The new family dynamic has put them in a new top spot to compete with the best. His personality, determination and pride run deep.

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